Perfect Attendance

I’ve been asked to leave a yoga class for laughing at a man farting loudly. I’ve also sent myself hurtling into a mirror off a Swiss ball back-side first. I like the gym environment, it’s dynamic, and it’s entertaining, but a gym habit requires commitment. It’s also not exactly embedded in the fabric of my being (I bunked P.E. for 4 years, my teachers didn’t even know what I looked like).

Nevertheless, now as a fully fledged grownup, I persist. My response to my lackadaisical attendance is to set up a workout environment that allows dizzy mums like myself to bring their children to the studio and blitz the jiggle in a team effort. The plan is to allow myself, and others to bring the kids and workout, or leave them at home and hang out, or neither, or both – but just to be there. This I think will inspire those of a shy and most probably lazy disposition (not unlike my old self) to jiggle a little in the comfort and company of kindred spirits.

M

Perfect Attendance

New (Under)Developments

The new website hasn’t broken the internet, yet. On the plus side I have got a grasp of Google+ and how ‘my pages’ and ‘my business’ work (should be helpful). Now I’m all verified, I’m on a marketing (without spamming) micro-mission.

The budget has been well and truly squeezed. I ordered the last food shop, and left just enough for household bills until the end of next month. That’s it. Literally. Lots of leisurely walks for myself and the kids coming up.

Now ought to be the time to get creative. Where it’s all been relative whimsy so far, shopping, painting, decorating, liaising… It’s time to grow up. Maybe there’s a guide to that on Pinterest?

Everything crossed.

M

New (Under)Developments

Internet Home School

Mr. Bossmother asked if I’d written anything today (unlike him). And I hadn’t, because I was busy smashing my head into the keyboard trying to understand why I couldn’t find my website on Google.

I then discovered, through a process of massive flapping, web forum reading, live-chatting, and other frantic behaviours, that I quite literally have no idea what the hell I’m doing. The information is out there and though it may take you a small lifetime to wade through the jargon (if you are as computer-illiterate as I am), it’s worth trying. If my entire budget hadn’t been spent (see Guerilla budgeting and why it’s shit), I would have payed somebody to do this all for me.

Starting to scratch the surface now. There’s a stubborn beast in me, and I will crack this intramanet malarky!

I’m home-schooling myself now in online presence and how to appear in a search engine because, fortunately for me, I have a husband who brings snacks and lets me get on with it.

M

Internet Home School

Shooting oneself in the foot

Disloyalty is a new symptom of our desire for success.

I’m met with backhand deals, under-the-table offers, and the finest levels of undercutting daily. I’m talking all aspects of trade, electricity suppliers to private clients. Everybody is bent on being ‘better off’.

You’ve probably saved a bit of cash by switching to something cheaper, faster, or sexier, but does that always equate to getting a better deal – is spending less even a real reward? However advantageous you may feel a move was, you may have left a steadfast stakeholder in the lurch. What then is the real expense?

I find myself guilty of classless impatience. It’s prompted me to drop offers and unwittingly break bonds to persons with a stake in my business. It’s really only when you step back and examine the wreck, you see the real damage.

Then I question, how often have I brushed people aside because what they were offering wasn’t instantly gratifying. Those sentiments don’t stretch to ex boyfriends, but you can see where I’m going. It’s a brand of greed synonymous with our times and we are all guilty. I don’t care how sanctimonious you are, even the charities are doing it!

Do we go around shooting ourselves in the foot by ignoring valuable service, compliant customers and worthy suppliers for want of squirrelling quick cash, or are we better off living fast and climbing young?

M

Shooting oneself in the foot

Guerilla Budgeting

budget
noun:
1 your budget for the week: financial plan, forecast; accounts, statement.
2 a cut in the defense budget: allowance, allocation, quota; grant, award, funds, resources, capital.

The act of budgeting is customary to any new practice. At least I think it should be, because it is probably pretty important. Scribbling things on the backs of receipts or envelopes shouldn’t really be a businessy thing, but when you’re me it tends to be.

I knew what funds I had for start-up purposes, they would cover my initial expenses as I did some primary-school sums on the back of one of my mum’s letters. I came in on budget, more by miracle or divine intervention than wisdom. I inadvertently ‘invented’ this thing I now call guerilla budgeting, and as I discovered last night (on a toy packaging carton), it’s pretty rubbish.

I forecast that I needed £n to break even after all my expenses/overheads (which have all been listed on scraps of paper that were previously chewed by the printer). Then I worked out, at around 3am, that If I let the studio out for a hours a week, I would need to charge £x to make n. Got that? No, apparently neither did I because for the best part I severely undercut myself!

Last night I finally went back to my prodigious equation, I found that in fact x needed to be some 25% more, and that, without a significant number of weekly bookings at £x, I wouldn’t ever see a profit.

Fear not Fairybossmother fans, the figures have been adjusted, on my desk notepad which neatly sits under my keyboard. We have learned that while I may be in need of a good, but affordable accountant (as I have now spent my entire start-up budget), I am in fact really good at recycling.

M

Guerilla Budgeting

Network Marketing – gauging your expectations

You’ve been enticed by a sexy pie chart or picture of smiling people with inhumanely white teeth. Your friend (family member, or salesperson) is obviously very enthusiastic. You like the idea of ‘working from home’ and before you know it you’re keen to sign up to something you probably know very little about.

I deduced from my own NM journey, that the key to any degree of success is gauging your expectations from the moment you sign up…

On the whole, Multi-level or Network Marketing companies can provide you with a tidy residual income (for as long as you remain involved). They sometimes look really bad. Some deserve bad press by virtue of encouraging members to be pushy, over-inflatine the truth, and make glossy promises to the uninformed public. Some don’t deserve bad press at all, but still have abhorrent humans tarnishing the brand’s reputation with their personal class of ridiculousness.

The best, and only advice to sort the shiny from the shit is, ‘if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is’.

My key advice would be to ask yourself the following questions:

  • Does this company have an ethos or code of conduct I agree with?
  • Do I believe in or use their product or service?
  • Am I being asked to pay for joining, and does this joining fee seem justifiable?
  • Is the discount you receive worth the joining fee?
  • Can I make a profit?
  • Am I expected to pay a monthly fee or buy a ‘minimum amount’ (regardless of wether I am selling it or not), in order to stay a member or retain any people I’ve signed up?
  • Could this leave me vulnerable in times when I don’t have much trade?
  • What do I hope to earn from this?
  • Will I exhaust my enthusiasm with pushy sales before I see a profit, or is this a structure I can build on with my skill-set?
  • Can I learn, develop my confidence, and see personal growth in this company?
  • Will I dedicate myself to a part-time or full time business?
  • Am I unrealistic in expecting full-time money if I’m only dedicating myself to working part time?

If you can’t answer any of the above, you may want to start looking for a 9 to 5.

There are some great NMs out there, honestly – I’ve rep’d one for 2 and a half years now and I’ve had success relative to my expectations. I phrase it like that, because I’m not an expert or a millionaire, but I’ve been known to pay the bills! The rewards are completely reflective of the efforts. That is important to me when we’re in an environment where we don’t always earn what we’re worth. Also, I get to work in my pyjamas and on a monday morning that is reward enough.

M

Network Marketing – gauging your expectations